Discussion:
More schnitzels
(too old to reply)
Martin
2014-03-13 09:03:16 UTC
Permalink
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Erilar
2014-03-13 12:36:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet. Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist with iPad
Martin
2014-03-13 13:49:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet. Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.

Danish Pork Scratchings! What ever next?
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/SID-585C0670-8F106C07/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm?action=showDetail&id=2118
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
JohnT
2014-03-13 15:04:55 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet. Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
--
JohnT
James Silverton
2014-03-13 15:17:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
Martin
2014-03-13 20:20:21 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 11:17:09 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Bleaaahh!

Bavaria is Dutch despite the name. There has been a court case which the brewery
won.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
James Silverton
2014-03-14 14:28:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is real even if I wouldn't drink it. In 1876, the name Budweiser
was adopted by the American brewer Adolphus Bush. When the Czech
brewery, 20 years later (just after after consolidation of the many
small breweries in 1895), wished to begin exports to the New World, this
caused problems, and Budvar had to be given another name.
--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
Erilar
2014-03-15 15:33:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is real even if I wouldn't drink it. In 1876, the name Budweiser
was adopted by the American brewer Adolphus Bush. When the Czech brewery,
20 years later (just after after consolidation of the many small
breweries in 1895), wished to begin exports to the New World, this caused
problems, and Budvar had to be given another name.
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist with iPad
James Silverton
2014-03-15 15:59:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erilar
Post by James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is real even if I wouldn't drink it. In 1876, the name Budweiser
was adopted by the American brewer Adolphus Bush. When the Czech brewery,
20 years later (just after after consolidation of the many small
breweries in 1895), wished to begin exports to the New World, this caused
problems, and Budvar had to be given another name.
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
"Grossly inferior" is a matter of taste. Even if I don't like Bud and
might agree with you, lots of others obviously do like it. I've seen it
sold from a snacks cart on a British train.
--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
Martin
2014-03-15 16:24:18 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 15 Mar 2014 11:59:19 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by Erilar
Post by James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is real even if I wouldn't drink it. In 1876, the name Budweiser
was adopted by the American brewer Adolphus Bush. When the Czech brewery,
20 years later (just after after consolidation of the many small
breweries in 1895), wished to begin exports to the New World, this caused
problems, and Budvar had to be given another name.
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
"Grossly inferior" is a matter of taste. Even if I don't like Bud and
might agree with you, lots of others obviously do like it. I've seen it
sold from a snacks cart on a British train.
That's hardly a criteria for a good beer. Young people in UK will drink anything
that is cold fizzy and has alcohol in it. Lots of people like Heineken, partly
because Heineken spend a lot on publicising it.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Surreyman
2014-03-15 16:29:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
On Sat, 15 Mar 2014 11:59:19 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by Erilar
Post by James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to
time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are
gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is real even if I wouldn't drink it. In 1876, the name Budweiser
was adopted by the American brewer Adolphus Bush. When the Czech brewery,
20 years later (just after after consolidation of the many small
breweries in 1895), wished to begin exports to the New World, this caused
problems, and Budvar had to be given another name.
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
"Grossly inferior" is a matter of taste. Even if I don't like Bud and
might agree with you, lots of others obviously do like it. I've seen it
sold from a snacks cart on a British train.
That's hardly a criteria for a good beer. Young people in UK will drink anything
that is cold fizzy and has alcohol in it. Lots of people like Heineken, partly
because Heineken spend a lot on publicising it.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
The only good beers are draught bitters freshly pulled from the pump at not much less than room temperature and, largely, not national brands. But that's just a mere Brit opinion - what do we know about beer!
James Silverton
2014-03-15 16:54:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Surreyman
Post by Martin
On Sat, 15 Mar 2014 11:59:19 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by Erilar
Post by James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to
time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are
gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is real even if I wouldn't drink it. In 1876, the name Budweiser
was adopted by the American brewer Adolphus Bush. When the Czech brewery,
20 years later (just after after consolidation of the many small
breweries in 1895), wished to begin exports to the New World, this caused
problems, and Budvar had to be given another name.
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
"Grossly inferior" is a matter of taste. Even if I don't like Bud and
might agree with you, lots of others obviously do like it. I've seen it
sold from a snacks cart on a British train.
That's hardly a criteria for a good beer. Young people in UK will drink anything
that is cold fizzy and has alcohol in it. Lots of people like Heineken, partly
because Heineken spend a lot on publicising it.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
The only good beers are draught bitters freshly pulled from the pump at not much less than room temperature and, largely, not national brands. But that's just a mere Brit opinion - what do we know about beer!
IMO, there are many widely sold bottled beers that I enjoy; a large
number from the Sam Adams company in the US. There are smaller but
bigger than "craft" companies, like the Brooklyn Brewing Company and
Dogfish Head.

There are quite large companies with a German heritage in Mexico; I'd
single out Cerveza Negra from the Modelo Company.

I really prefer bottled Guinness Export Extra to the draft from a pump.
As for temperature, I like beer from the refrigerator.
--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
Martin
2014-03-15 16:59:01 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 15 Mar 2014 09:29:58 -0700 (PDT), Surreyman
Post by Surreyman
Post by Martin
On Sat, 15 Mar 2014 11:59:19 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by Erilar
Post by James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to
time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are
gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is real even if I wouldn't drink it. In 1876, the name Budweiser
was adopted by the American brewer Adolphus Bush. When the Czech brewery,
20 years later (just after after consolidation of the many small
breweries in 1895), wished to begin exports to the New World, this caused
problems, and Budvar had to be given another name.
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
"Grossly inferior" is a matter of taste. Even if I don't like Bud and
might agree with you, lots of others obviously do like it. I've seen it
sold from a snacks cart on a British train.
That's hardly a criteria for a good beer. Young people in UK will drink anything
that is cold fizzy and has alcohol in it. Lots of people like Heineken, partly
because Heineken spend a lot on publicising it.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
The only good beers are draught bitters freshly pulled from the pump at not much less than room temperature and, largely, not national brands. But that's just a mere Brit opinion - what do we know about beer!
I agree with you, except I like Budvar and some of the German lagers too.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Erilar
2014-03-15 19:40:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Surreyman
Post by Martin
On Sat, 15 Mar 2014 11:59:19 -0400, James Silverton
Martin in Zuid Holland
The only good beers are draught bitters freshly pulled from the pump at
not much less than room temperature and, largely, not national brands.
But that's just a mere Brit opinion - what do we know about beer!
I learned in the course of a number of trips to Germany over the years that
there were places where it was possible to drink locally-brewed beer, and
recently in the US similar places have begun to appear, such as one a few
miles south of here in very rural Wisconsin. I've heard it,s pretty good,
but don't know a Brit or German who's tested it 8-)
--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist with iPad
Gawdlezz
2014-03-23 15:42:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erilar
I learned in the course of a number of trips to Germany over the years that
there were places where it was possible to drink locally-brewed beer, and
recently in the US similar places have begun to appear, such as one a few
miles south of here in very rural Wisconsin. I've heard it,s pretty good,
but don't know a Brit or German who's tested it 8-)
In just a couple of weeks, a Craft Brewers Conference will take place in
Denver, CO, and it will include a competitive judging event called World
Beer Cup. WBC will include beer-expert judges from all over the world,
including the UK and Germany, as well as Austria, Belgium, the Czech
Republic, Denmark, and so on, as well as from Asia, and yes, from the
USA and Canada too. Beers are tasted and compared "blind" (no labels, no
knowledge of who brewed them) according to specific styles and
categories.

There have been significant upsets over the last few years in which
American beers have come out with the first-place gold medal over
highly-regarded European beers. The Europeans were considered sure bets
to win, and remember, these were "blind" tastings with international
panels of judging experts. In Germany, there was more than a little
hand-wringing over this, even a TV documentary special entitled "Hopfen
und Malz verloren?" ("Hops and Malt gone missing?"), lamenting what
appears to be a decline in European beer brewers' fortune, while the
emerging specialist brewers of North America gain prominence. In 2012,
an American brewer took the gold medal for the Heller Bock / Maibock
category, something Bavarian brewers thought they had sewed up; a
brewery from Ulm did take the silver, though.

Speculation as to the current nature of brewing both in the Americas and
in Europe is, for a lot of people (including a lot of participants
here) shrouded in misinformation instead of fact. A few large well-
known brewing companies in the USA have set a reputation for cheap,
mass-produced bland beers, and this is what is fixed in the minds of
people elsewhere. The truth is that the USA now has nearly 3000 brewing
enterprises, and the number continues to grew. Nearly all the growth is
in the specialist "craft" segment of the overall beer market.

In Europe, talk is of mature markets in decline, especially in Germany,
but also in the UK and Belgium, among others. Some are looking to the
American models for new inspiration and potential revival of success.
Surreyman
2014-03-24 10:09:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gawdlezz
Post by Erilar
I learned in the course of a number of trips to Germany over the years that
there were places where it was possible to drink locally-brewed beer, and
recently in the US similar places have begun to appear, such as one a few
miles south of here in very rural Wisconsin. I've heard it,s pretty good,
but don't know a Brit or German who's tested it 8-)
In just a couple of weeks, a Craft Brewers Conference will take place in
Denver, CO, and it will include a competitive judging event called World
Beer Cup. WBC will include beer-expert judges from all over the world,
including the UK and Germany, as well as Austria, Belgium, the Czech
Republic, Denmark, and so on, as well as from Asia, and yes, from the
USA and Canada too. Beers are tasted and compared "blind" (no labels, no
knowledge of who brewed them) according to specific styles and
categories.
There have been significant upsets over the last few years in which
American beers have come out with the first-place gold medal over
highly-regarded European beers. The Europeans were considered sure bets
to win, and remember, these were "blind" tastings with international
panels of judging experts. In Germany, there was more than a little
hand-wringing over this, even a TV documentary special entitled "Hopfen
und Malz verloren?" ("Hops and Malt gone missing?"), lamenting what
appears to be a decline in European beer brewers' fortune, while the
emerging specialist brewers of North America gain prominence. In 2012,
an American brewer took the gold medal for the Heller Bock / Maibock
category, something Bavarian brewers thought they had sewed up; a
brewery from Ulm did take the silver, though.
Speculation as to the current nature of brewing both in the Americas and
in Europe is, for a lot of people (including a lot of participants
here) shrouded in misinformation instead of fact. A few large well-
known brewing companies in the USA have set a reputation for cheap,
mass-produced bland beers, and this is what is fixed in the minds of
people elsewhere. The truth is that the USA now has nearly 3000 brewing
enterprises, and the number continues to grew. Nearly all the growth is
in the specialist "craft" segment of the overall beer market.
In Europe, talk is of mature markets in decline, especially in Germany,
but also in the UK and Belgium, among others. Some are looking to the
American models for new inspiration and potential revival of success.
Same with international blind wine tastings. France & Germany no longer automatically win by any means.
Tim C.
2014-03-24 10:18:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gawdlezz
In just a couple of weeks, a Craft Brewers Conference will take place in
Denver, CO, and it will include a competitive judging event called World
Beer Cup. WBC will include beer-expert judges from all over the world,
including the UK and Germany, as well as Austria, Belgium, the Czech
Republic, Denmark, and so on, as well as from Asia, and yes, from the
USA and Canada too. Beers are tasted and compared "blind" (no labels, no
knowledge of who brewed them) according to specific styles and
categories.
I can believe that. There are many excellent American beers, although I've
yet to find a decent one made by a major brewery. The Germans and Austrians
have had most of their breweries taken over by major concerns and I think
quality is suffering. They make what sells, not what tastes good.
--
Tim C. Linz, Austria.
Martin
2014-03-24 10:25:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim C.
Post by Gawdlezz
In just a couple of weeks, a Craft Brewers Conference will take place in
Denver, CO, and it will include a competitive judging event called World
Beer Cup. WBC will include beer-expert judges from all over the world,
including the UK and Germany, as well as Austria, Belgium, the Czech
Republic, Denmark, and so on, as well as from Asia, and yes, from the
USA and Canada too. Beers are tasted and compared "blind" (no labels, no
knowledge of who brewed them) according to specific styles and
categories.
I can believe that. There are many excellent American beers, although I've
yet to find a decent one made by a major brewery. The Germans and Austrians
have had most of their breweries taken over by major concerns and I think
quality is suffering. They make what sells, not what tastes good.
Especially Munich breweries partly owned by Heineken! Paulaner for example.
The good news is that European sales of factory made gnats piss are falling.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Tim C.
2014-03-24 11:56:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
Post by Tim C.
Post by Gawdlezz
In just a couple of weeks, a Craft Brewers Conference will take place in
Denver, CO, and it will include a competitive judging event called World
Beer Cup. WBC will include beer-expert judges from all over the world,
including the UK and Germany, as well as Austria, Belgium, the Czech
Republic, Denmark, and so on, as well as from Asia, and yes, from the
USA and Canada too. Beers are tasted and compared "blind" (no labels, no
knowledge of who brewed them) according to specific styles and
categories.
I can believe that. There are many excellent American beers, although I've
yet to find a decent one made by a major brewery. The Germans and Austrians
have had most of their breweries taken over by major concerns and I think
quality is suffering. They make what sells, not what tastes good.
Especially Munich breweries partly owned by Heineken! Paulaner for example.
The good news is that European sales of factory made gnats piss are falling.
There has been a recent revival of smaller breweries here. Many that have
been around for a while but never got a much of a look-in are now available
in the supermarkets. And an increasing proportion of "Zwickl" beers, which
is beer which has not had the final fine filtration, and so is a little
cloudy. Not as much as a "Hefe" or yeast beer.
--
Tim C. Linz, Austria.
Martin
2014-03-15 16:21:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erilar
Post by James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is real even if I wouldn't drink it. In 1876, the name Budweiser
was adopted by the American brewer Adolphus Bush. When the Czech brewery,
20 years later (just after after consolidation of the many small
breweries in 1895), wished to begin exports to the New World, this caused
problems, and Budvar had to be given another name.
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
IMO all the well known US brands are inferior and anything made in UK called
lager too, although I have heard US micro breweries have mastered the art of
turning water, hops, yeast and barley into beer.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
JohnT
2014-03-15 20:55:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
--
JohnT
Martin
2014-03-15 22:02:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
US Bud is inferior to water.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
tim.....
2014-03-15 22:09:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
US Bud is inferior to water.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

except in the sense that it is "safe to drink"

(that is why society drank weak beer in the first place)

tim
Martin
2014-03-16 09:25:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
US Bud is inferior to water.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
except in the sense that it is "safe to drink"
Do you know what is in Bud? I and some others get stomach pains after drinking
small amounts of some of these factory beers including Heineken.
Post by Martin
(that is why society drank weak beer in the first place)
but it wasn't carbonated sugar solution with synthetic colouring
Post by Martin
tim
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
-hh
2014-03-23 02:07:33 UTC
Permalink
Dang, missed a good beer thread.
Post by Martin
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
US Bud is inferior to water.
US Bud won't pass the classical German 'beer purity law' standards, if for
no other reason than it is brewed with rice instead of only barley.


-hh
James Silverton
2014-03-23 15:36:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by -hh
Dang, missed a good beer thread.
Post by Martin
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
US Bud is inferior to water.
US Bud won't pass the classical German 'beer purity law' standards, if for
no other reason than it is brewed with rice instead of only barley.
Rice is not used for Bud as an economy measure but as a conscious choice
in making the brew. I don't like the rather tasteless stuff but it is
not bad on a summer day, cooled until there are crystals of ice.

German beers do not meet the original Bavarian purity law either since
yeast is not mentioned in the law. Good beers are made all over Europe
and the US without regard to this provincial German measure. White or
wheat beer is made in Belgium, Germany, Holland and the US too.
--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
Martin
2014-03-23 16:09:24 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 23 Mar 2014 11:36:41 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by -hh
Dang, missed a good beer thread.
Post by Martin
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
US Bud is inferior to water.
US Bud won't pass the classical German 'beer purity law' standards, if for
no other reason than it is brewed with rice instead of only barley.
Rice is not used for Bud as an economy measure but as a conscious choice
in making the brew.
LOL ,It was used originally because it was cheaper than using malted barley.
Post by James Silverton
I don't like the rather tasteless stuff but it is
not bad on a summer day, cooled until there are crystals of ice.
One can chill any foul tasting liquid enough to make it drinkable. Try Bud at
10C/50F to appreciate the real taste.
Post by James Silverton
German beers do not meet the original Bavarian purity law either since
yeast is not mentioned in the law. Good beers are made all over Europe
and the US without regard to this provincial German measure. White or
wheat beer is made in Belgium, Germany, Holland and the US too.
Yeast didn't need to be mentioned, because it occurred naturally.

Whether or not beer meets Bavarian purity laws is a fair indication of whether
it is beer or the output of a chemical plant.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Gawdlezz
2014-03-23 16:20:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
On Sun, 23 Mar 2014 11:36:41 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by -hh
Dang, missed a good beer thread.
Post by Martin
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
US Bud is inferior to water.
US Bud won't pass the classical German 'beer purity law' standards, if for
no other reason than it is brewed with rice instead of only barley.
Rice is not used for Bud as an economy measure but as a conscious choice
in making the brew.
LOL ,It was used originally because it was cheaper than using malted barley.
Post by James Silverton
I don't like the rather tasteless stuff but it is
not bad on a summer day, cooled until there are crystals of ice.
One can chill any foul tasting liquid enough to make it drinkable. Try Bud at
10C/50F to appreciate the real taste.
Post by James Silverton
German beers do not meet the original Bavarian purity law either since
yeast is not mentioned in the law. Good beers are made all over Europe
and the US without regard to this provincial German measure. White or
wheat beer is made in Belgium, Germany, Holland and the US too.
Yeast didn't need to be mentioned, because it occurred naturally.
Other ingredients used in beer, including non-barley malted grains, are
also "natural" but non allowed under the 1516 Ordinance (which was not
actually called the "Reinheitsgebot" - that legal ordinance didn't come
along until much later, and it _does_ include yeast).
Post by Martin
Whether or not beer meets Bavarian purity laws is a fair indication of whether
it is beer or the output of a chemical plant.
Incorrect. Many Belgian beers, including Trappist ales, white beers, and
lambics, do not comply. Also, a recognized and legal historical style
brewed in Germany (in Goslar and Leipzig) doesn't comply as well, and
some German brewers are now experimenting with "non-compliant" styles
that the law doesn't allow to be called "Bier," but are hardly laden
with chemicals any more than a "compliant" beer is.
Martin
2014-03-23 16:53:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gawdlezz
Post by Martin
On Sun, 23 Mar 2014 11:36:41 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by -hh
Dang, missed a good beer thread.
Post by Martin
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
US Bud is inferior to water.
US Bud won't pass the classical German 'beer purity law' standards, if for
no other reason than it is brewed with rice instead of only barley.
Rice is not used for Bud as an economy measure but as a conscious choice
in making the brew.
LOL ,It was used originally because it was cheaper than using malted barley.
Post by James Silverton
I don't like the rather tasteless stuff but it is
not bad on a summer day, cooled until there are crystals of ice.
One can chill any foul tasting liquid enough to make it drinkable. Try Bud at
10C/50F to appreciate the real taste.
Post by James Silverton
German beers do not meet the original Bavarian purity law either since
yeast is not mentioned in the law. Good beers are made all over Europe
and the US without regard to this provincial German measure. White or
wheat beer is made in Belgium, Germany, Holland and the US too.
Yeast didn't need to be mentioned, because it occurred naturally.
Other ingredients used in beer, including non-barley malted grains, are
also "natural" but non allowed under the 1516 Ordinance (which was not
actually called the "Reinheitsgebot" - that legal ordinance didn't come
along until much later, and it _does_ include yeast).
Post by Martin
Whether or not beer meets Bavarian purity laws is a fair indication of whether
it is beer or the output of a chemical plant.
Incorrect. Many Belgian beers, including Trappist ales, white beers, and
lambics, do not comply. Also, a recognized and legal historical style
brewed in Germany (in Goslar and Leipzig) doesn't comply as well, and
some German brewers are now experimenting with "non-compliant" styles
that the law doesn't allow to be called "Bier," but are hardly laden
with chemicals any more than a "compliant" beer is.
So that is the exceptions dealt with.
I said a fair indication.
How about the mass produced crap that is sold as beer and lager.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Gawdlezz
2014-03-23 17:16:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
Post by Gawdlezz
Post by Martin
Whether or not beer meets Bavarian purity laws is a fair indication of whether
it is beer or the output of a chemical plant.
Incorrect. Many Belgian beers, including Trappist ales, white beers, and
lambics, do not comply. Also, a recognized and legal historical style
brewed in Germany (in Goslar and Leipzig) doesn't comply as well, and
some German brewers are now experimenting with "non-compliant" styles
that the law doesn't allow to be called "Bier," but are hardly laden
with chemicals any more than a "compliant" beer is.
So that is the exceptions dealt with.
I said a fair indication.
How about the mass produced crap that is sold as beer and lager.
You want more "exceptions?" Many good-quality British ales - even
cask beers - are brewed with brewer's sugar.

The mass-produced crap is brewed with pale malts, adjunct grains,
and sugars, fermented with yeasts, flavored very minimally with hops,
using local water. Lagering periods are very short, so the resulting
product tastes like it, and if such beers aren't cold-conditioned
for very long, fermentation by-products remain. The flavors those
by-products contribute are what some refer to as "chemical," not
knowing how to describe the range of off-flavors that can and do
occur naturally in beer. In other words, besides CO2 and alcohol,
there are quite a lot of other chemical by-products resulting from
fermentation. The chemicals aren't added; they simply happen. Good
brewers know how to cope with this, controlling fermentation
parameters like temperature and conditioning time.

You may feel free to describe the chemical contents of these mass
produced beers. Bland flavors and gassy character are not necessarily
the results of a "chemical plant." The inside workings of a large
brewing facility look a lot like a smaller brewery, other than scale.
In the past, some brewers have attempted to use ingredients to improve
head retention, for instance. The resulting products have failed for
other reasons.
-hh
2014-03-23 21:04:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gawdlezz
Post by Martin
Whether or not beer meets Bavarian purity laws is a fair indication
of whether it is beer or the output of a chemical plant.
Incorrect. Many Belgian beers, including Trappist ales, white beers, and
lambics, do not comply.
Despite repeated attempts by the Germans to make Belgium part of Germany,
including as recently as 1945.

From a pedant standpoint, I can see the point, but there's also counterpoints.
For example, Budwieser can't decide to go brew/sell a "Trappist" beer tomorrow
either, because that label similarly carries some pedantic requirements too.

As a generalization, I nevertheless believe that the sentiment is a reasonable
point, particularly when we're looking at product that's merely being called
'beer' instead of some speciality niche. Personally, I like several of the Belgians,
particularly the Dubbels, even though it clearly isn't suited to be employed
as a "slam down a cold one" after mowing the lawn on a hot summer day.


-hh
Gawdlezz
2014-03-23 22:05:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by -hh
From a pedant standpoint, I can see the point, but there's also counterpoints.
For example, Budwieser can't decide to go brew/sell a "Trappist" beer tomorrow
either, because that label similarly carries some pedantic requirements too.
There are specific (and protected) requirements to become certified as
a "Trappist" brewer, and private corporations can't do it. However, a
private corporation can make an "abbey" ale, styled to be very similar
to a Trappist beer, and A-B's partner company, InBev, does just that.

It's called "Leffe," and it comes in several varieties. These beers
don't pass German brewing rules either, due to use of added sugars.
Post by -hh
As a generalization, I nevertheless believe that the sentiment is a reasonable
point, particularly when we're looking at product that's merely being called
'beer' instead of some speciality niche.
All beers are some form of specialty niche or another, even mass-
produced lagers.
-hh
2014-03-25 01:41:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gawdlezz
Post by -hh
From a pedant standpoint, I can see the point, but there's also counterpoints.
For example, Budwieser can't decide to go brew/sell a "Trappist" beer tomorrow
either, because that label similarly carries some pedantic requirements too.
There are specific (and protected) requirements to become certified as
a "Trappist" brewer, and private corporations can't do it. However, a
private corporation can make an "abbey" ale, styled to be very similar
to a Trappist beer, and A-B's partner company, InBev, does just that.
Which was my point.
Post by Gawdlezz
It's called "Leffe," and it comes in several varieties. These beers
don't pass German brewing rules either, due to use of added sugars.
Oh, I'm quite familiar with Leffe ...

<Loading Image...>

...and also that I haven't been able to find Leffe Brune in the USA.
Post by Gawdlezz
Post by -hh
As a generalization, I nevertheless believe that the sentiment is a reasonable
point, particularly when we're looking at product that's merely being called
'beer' instead of some speciality niche.
All beers are some form of specialty niche or another, even mass-
produced lagers.
Fair enough, but there's still been a lot of cost-driven measures as well as
making the stuff blandly inoffensive so as to broaden its appeal and increase
product sales. Functionally, it was such big business decisions which ultimately
lead to the creation of the microbrew market in the USA.


-hh
Gawdlezz
2014-03-27 00:27:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by -hh
Oh, I'm quite familiar with Leffe ...
<http://www.photo-hh.com/Europe/Pages/Belgium-08_files/Media/IMG_8344_2/IMG_8344_2.jpg>
...and also that I haven't been able to find Leffe Brune in the USA.
I don't know if that's such a loss. There are other similar beers
available. But if you like that particular one, yeah, I don't think
A-B InBev have gotten around to importing it to the USA yet.

Is that a glass of Belle-Vue Kriek next to it?
Post by -hh
Post by Gawdlezz
All beers are some form of specialty niche or another, even mass-
produced lagers.
Fair enough, but there's still been a lot of cost-driven measures as well as
making the stuff blandly inoffensive so as to broaden its appeal and increase
product sales. Functionally, it was such big business decisions which ultimately
lead to the creation of the microbrew market in the USA.
It's more about selling to a mass consumer market, including people who
may not like the taste of actual beer. The big brewers who market this
stuff have painted themselves into a corner, heavily dependent on a
market that cares about them less and less.

Craft brewing originally emerged as a sort of answer to "why can't we
get fresh European-style beers in the USA?" This was back when a lot
of imports were stale and in pretty bad shape. Things certainly have
changed, mostly for the better, since then. American specialist brewers
have gotten a lot better at making this kind of thing. However, nothing
compares to some of classic pubs and beer gardens of the Old World.
Tim C.
2014-03-28 11:27:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gawdlezz
All beers are some form of specialty niche or another, even mass-
produced lagers.
I think you're stretching the definition of "niche" a touch too far.
--
Tim C. Linz, Austria.
Gawdlezz
2014-03-30 16:08:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim C.
Post by Gawdlezz
All beers are some form of specialty niche or another, even mass-
produced lagers.
I think you're stretching the definition of "niche" a touch too far.
To be fair, such things started out (a long time ago) as a set of
niche products. Now, the niche has pretty much filled the room.
Tim C.
2014-03-31 07:34:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gawdlezz
Post by Tim C.
Post by Gawdlezz
All beers are some form of specialty niche or another, even mass-
produced lagers.
I think you're stretching the definition of "niche" a touch too far.
To be fair, such things started out (a long time ago) as a set of
niche products. Now, the niche has pretty much filled the room.
And the garden and most of the park.
--
Tim C. Linz, Austria.
Martin
2014-03-31 08:14:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim C.
Post by Gawdlezz
Post by Tim C.
Post by Gawdlezz
All beers are some form of specialty niche or another, even mass-
produced lagers.
I think you're stretching the definition of "niche" a touch too far.
To be fair, such things started out (a long time ago) as a set of
niche products. Now, the niche has pretty much filled the room.
And the garden and most of the park.
in the case of Heineken it has resulted floods.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland


Gawdlezz
2014-03-23 16:28:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
On Sun, 23 Mar 2014 11:36:41 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Rice is not used for Bud as an economy measure but as a conscious choice
in making the brew.
LOL ,It was used originally because it was cheaper than using malted barley.
Incorrect.

The brewing barley available to 19th century brewers in the USA was of
the six-row variety, more economical to grow but rather less suited to
making the clear lagers that were ascending in production and popularity
at the time. The brewers (many of them immigrants from Germany and
Austria) figured out that using adjunct grains - brewer's corn and rice
among them - assisted in making for a cleaner, clearer product, as was
intended. The adjunct grains were sources for more starches that were
convertible to brewing sugars when mashed in with the six-row barley
malt. They weren't necessarily cheaper than barley malt; prices have
always varied among the commodities. They were used to achieve a
desired result. The bigger changes in such beers came after 1933, when
the American public had to be re-introduced to fresh commercially
produced beer, and brewers found out they'd lost their taste for more
bitter, assertive beers. The dumbing down of American mass-produced
beer was the result, and that is hardly unique to the USA. Even modern
German beers - Pilsner lagers in particular - have been significantly
dumbed down over the last few decades.
EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
2014-03-16 07:00:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
JohnT
2014-03-16 08:53:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
There are now lots of good American craft beers and I have sampled quite a
few of them on the West Coast. Factory beers in Europe can be as execrably
bad as in the USA. Stella Artois is now almost as bad as Bud (they have the
same ownership) and Heineken is. and always has been, tasteless.
--
JohnT
Martin
2014-03-16 09:32:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnT
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
There are now lots of good American craft beers and I have sampled quite a
few of them on the West Coast. Factory beers in Europe can be as execrably
bad as in the USA. Stella Artois is now almost as bad as Bud (they have the
same ownership) and Heineken is. and always has been, tasteless.
A Dutch specialist beer website describes Heineken as tasting of damp beer mats
:-)
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Martin
2014-03-16 09:29:24 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
2014-03-16 19:56:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Don't think I've ever encountered it - most of my experience has been
with Belgian and German. I have a question about "shelf-life", however.
I've been hoarding a couple bottles of Belgian in my fridge awaiting a
special occasion, and suddenly realized it's been there for nearly six
years! Is it still drinkable, or should I just pour it down the drain?
Martin
2014-03-16 22:26:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 12:56:00 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Don't think I've ever encountered it - most of my experience has been
with Belgian and German. I have a question about "shelf-life", however.
I've been hoarding a couple bottles of Belgian in my fridge awaiting a
special occasion, and suddenly realized it's been there for nearly six
years! Is it still drinkable, or should I just pour it down the drain?
Yes.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
2014-03-17 05:53:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 12:56:00 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Don't think I've ever encountered it - most of my experience has been
with Belgian and German. I have a question about "shelf-life", however.
I've been hoarding a couple bottles of Belgian in my fridge awaiting a
special occasion, and suddenly realized it's been there for nearly six
years! Is it still drinkable, or should I just pour it down the drain?
Yes.
Which? (It's drinkable, or discard it?)
Martin
2014-03-17 10:12:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 22:53:21 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 12:56:00 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Don't think I've ever encountered it - most of my experience has been
with Belgian and German. I have a question about "shelf-life", however.
I've been hoarding a couple bottles of Belgian in my fridge awaiting a
special occasion, and suddenly realized it's been there for nearly six
years! Is it still drinkable, or should I just pour it down the drain?
Yes.
Which? (It's drinkable, or discard it?)
Drink it and report back after you have recovered.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Gawdlezz
2014-03-23 15:46:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
I have a question about "shelf-life", however.
I've been hoarding a couple bottles of Belgian in my fridge awaiting a
special occasion, and suddenly realized it's been there for nearly six
years! Is it still drinkable, or should I just pour it down the drain?
With beer, a "special occasion" should generally be a day ending in "y."

Details, though: what beer is it, and what is the alcohol strength? A
few beers will be fine in cold storage for a few years. Many will simply
go stale, and that will be obvious upon opening: a damp, musty aroma, a
little like wet cardboard, will be evident. The beer will still be safe
to drink, if that aroma (and its flavor impact) isn't too dominant.

Otherwise, use it to cook something.
Frank Hucklenbroich
2014-03-17 08:33:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Some years ago they did serve Dutch "Grolsch" on German trains. Actually
not bad.

Regards,

Frank
Martin
2014-03-17 10:34:42 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 17 Mar 2014 09:33:08 +0100, Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Some years ago they did serve Dutch "Grolsch" on German trains. Actually
not bad.
Yes I drink Grolsch occasionally too. I don't class it as a near beer.
Heineken bought most of the good Dutch breweries, but there are still a few that
survive by making good beer.
Grolsch is brewed in Burton on Trent too, ever since it was taken over by
Molson/Coors. I haven't tried Grolsch in UK so I can't say whether it is the
same as the Groenlo, Enschede brewed Grolsch.

There's a list with comments here. There's a lot of cardboard about.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Martin
2014-03-17 11:00:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
On Mon, 17 Mar 2014 09:33:08 +0100, Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Some years ago they did serve Dutch "Grolsch" on German trains. Actually
not bad.
Yes I drink Grolsch occasionally too. I don't class it as a near beer.
Heineken bought most of the good Dutch breweries, but there are still a few that
survive by making good beer.
Grolsch is brewed in Burton on Trent too, ever since it was taken over by
Molson/Coors. I haven't tried Grolsch in UK so I can't say whether it is the
same as the Groenlo, Enschede brewed Grolsch.
There's a list with comments here. There's a lot of cardboard about.
Missing list

http://www.europeanbeerguide.net/hollbeer.htm

I like Gulpener Koren Wolf wit bier, which isn't on the list.
http://www.biernet.nl/bier/merken/gulpener-korenwolf-witbier
www.biernet.nl/bier/brouwerijen/nederland/limburg/gulpen/gulpener
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
James Silverton
2014-03-17 13:30:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
Post by Martin
On Mon, 17 Mar 2014 09:33:08 +0100, Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Some years ago they did serve Dutch "Grolsch" on German trains. Actually
not bad.
Yes I drink Grolsch occasionally too. I don't class it as a near beer.
Heineken bought most of the good Dutch breweries, but there are still a few that
survive by making good beer.
Grolsch is brewed in Burton on Trent too, ever since it was taken over by
Molson/Coors. I haven't tried Grolsch in UK so I can't say whether it is the
same as the Groenlo, Enschede brewed Grolsch.
There's a list with comments here. There's a lot of cardboard about.
Missing list
http://www.europeanbeerguide.net/hollbeer.htm
I like Gulpener Koren Wolf wit bier, which isn't on the list.
http://www.biernet.nl/bier/merken/gulpener-korenwolf-witbier
www.biernet.nl/bier/brouwerijen/nederland/limburg/gulpen/gulpener
The American Blue Moon is not a bad wheat (or is it white?) beer. I have
bought Grolsch in a local liquor store but remember nothing memorable
about it.
--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
Martin
2014-03-17 13:35:09 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 17 Mar 2014 09:30:37 -0400, James Silverton
Post by James Silverton
Post by Martin
Post by Martin
On Mon, 17 Mar 2014 09:33:08 +0100, Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Some years ago they did serve Dutch "Grolsch" on German trains. Actually
not bad.
Yes I drink Grolsch occasionally too. I don't class it as a near beer.
Heineken bought most of the good Dutch breweries, but there are still a few that
survive by making good beer.
Grolsch is brewed in Burton on Trent too, ever since it was taken over by
Molson/Coors. I haven't tried Grolsch in UK so I can't say whether it is the
same as the Groenlo, Enschede brewed Grolsch.
There's a list with comments here. There's a lot of cardboard about.
Missing list
http://www.europeanbeerguide.net/hollbeer.htm
I like Gulpener Koren Wolf wit bier, which isn't on the list.
http://www.biernet.nl/bier/merken/gulpener-korenwolf-witbier
www.biernet.nl/bier/brouwerijen/nederland/limburg/gulpen/gulpener
The American Blue Moon is not a bad wheat (or is it white?) beer.
I've seen both names used. Wit beer is made with wheat.
Post by James Silverton
I have
bought Grolsch in a local liquor store but remember nothing memorable
about it.
Other than it isn't absolutely revolting., which is probably why Coors have
acquired Grolsch.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Tim C.
2014-03-17 15:14:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
The American Blue Moon is not a bad wheat (or is it white?) beer.
Call it either, whatever you fancy. "Weiss" in this context is a
dialect/archaic word for "Weizen" (wheat).
--
Tim C. Linz, Austria.
Erilar
2014-03-17 14:50:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Some years ago they did serve Dutch "Grolsch" on German trains. Actually
not bad.
My son in law likes that.
--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist with iPad
Martin
2014-03-17 14:59:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erilar
Post by Frank Hucklenbroich
Post by Martin
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 00:00:25 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by JohnT
Post by Erilar
I'm allergic to beer, so what I know I've learned second-hand, but I was
told in Germany most emphatically that the US Bud was grossly inferior 8-)
US Bud is inferior to beer.
Once I'd encountered Belgian beer, I was off of the American varieties
forever! (Although German, Dutch and English are mostly drinkable, too.)
If you can drink Dutch near beer you can drink anything.
Some years ago they did serve Dutch "Grolsch" on German trains. Actually
not bad.
My son in law likes that.
Dutch Grolsch is definitely better than Budweisser and Coors.
A lot of Heineken brewed under licence foreign beers are tasteless.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Martin
2014-03-14 15:21:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is as genuine and has the same quality as a Lidl €2.49 Viking schnitzel.
:-)
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Erilar
2014-03-15 15:33:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is as genuine and has the same quality as a Lidl €2.49 Viking schnitzel.
:-)
That's what I suspected 8-)
--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist with iPad
Martin
2014-03-15 16:18:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erilar
Post by James Silverton
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet.
Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
US Bud is as genuine and has the same quality as a Lidl ?2.49 Viking schnitzel.
:-)
That's what I suspected 8-)
I admit to never having bought or eaten a Lidl schnitzel or having tried to brew
my own Budvar.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Gawdlezz
2014-03-23 17:29:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
You might as well have mentioned anything from Pripps or Ringnes - oh,
wait, Pripps and Ringnes are owned by Carlsberg too.

There are some good smaller brewers in Scandinavia too.

Carry on.
Gawdlezz
2014-03-23 17:41:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
Surely you'd want a Scandinavian beer like Carlsberg or Tuborg, tho' if
you need to *wash it down* even Budweiser would work.
Ah, but real Bud or US Bud?
The founding of the St. Louis brewery that produces "Budweiser"
predates the founding of the Budejovicky Budvar brewery. Also,
back in the 19th century, "Budweiser" was not a trademarked name,
and several breweries marketed a product under that brand, in the
USA and elsewhere.

So which one is the "real Bud?"

Also, be aware that there are two breweries in Budejovice, and both
market "Budweiser" beers where they are allowed to.
Martin
2014-03-13 20:18:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by JohnT
On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 12:36:24 +0000 (UTC), Erilar
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet. Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Do they wash it down with Bavaria beer?
:-)

or worse still Buckler.
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
Erilar
2014-03-14 13:42:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet. Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Aha! I thought there might be a secret ingredient in the breading 8-)
Post by Martin
Danish Pork Scratchings! What ever next?
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/SID-585C0670-8F106C07/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm?action=showDetail&id=2118
--
Erilar, biblioholic medievalist with iPad
Martin
2014-03-14 15:21:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
I can buy breaded pork cutlets at my local supermarket from time to time,
though they're smaller. "Name" such as "wiener" refer to the cooked
version normally, and that ad looks like a simple breaded cutlet. Any idea
why it' called "Viking?"
because it is Scandinavian week in Lidl in NL and the locals are gullible.
Aha! I thought there might be a secret ingredient in the breading 8-)
inbreeding?
Post by Erilar
Post by Martin
Danish Pork Scratchings! What ever next?
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/SID-585C0670-8F106C07/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm?action=showDetail&id=2118
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
terrable
2014-03-13 17:38:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
That looks like a good price for Danish blue cheese.
Martin
2014-03-13 20:20:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by terrable
Post by Martin
Lidl sells Viking schnitzels
http://www.lidl.nl/cps/rde/www_lidl_nl/hs.xsl/3883.htm
That looks like a good price for Danish blue cheese.
IMO too!
--
Martin in Zuid Holland
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