Discussion:
Beer (and food) in Britain revisited
(too old to reply)
randee
2005-11-22 22:10:44 UTC
Permalink
This thread has gotten so long I don't quite know where to enter it with
more info, so I will start anew.

The sandwich my wife had for 6 pounds sterling was not at Browns in the
West India Quay area as I thought, but rather at a bar near the 'Eye'.
Randee said it was a rather upscale bar and she figured the prices might
be a bit high, but they were hungry and spotted that bar before a pub.
The sandwich was a plain cheese and tomato sandwich with no side
dishes.

Without thinking she did order a lager to go with it. It was chilly
outside and she had actually wanted a 'warm' beer, but I think the term
'lager' appealed to her more than 'bitter'. She had just arrived and so
was still suffering jet lag (it is a 17 hour trip from here to Gatwick)
and not thinking too straight. As an aside, ales are served at the same
temperature as lagers here in the US, even at microbreweries.

Randee also tells me that the lunch menus at the places like Brown's
where she ate in the West India Quay area were all priced in the 4-5 UKP
region. Same for the small individual pizzas. She said the pizza's,
although good, were perhaps not that much better than what you get in
the US, and the price would have been reasonable if it were in USD.
From what I gather, the Canary Wharf area where she was staying is
perhaps somewhat high priced. SHe did not choose the area - not sure
who did, probably her niece who works for Marriott.

Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited England for weeks at
a time for many years (they are great Shakespeare fans and attend many
plays), and yet they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area. They said
they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that area caters more
to the business trade, rather than to the tourist trade.

For some reason the rest of her family did not seem to be too interested
in visiting pubs, although Randee said there was one about a mile from
their B&B in Hartpury that she would have liked to have tried. FWIW
HArtpury College used Gloucester Cathedral for the graduation ceremony.

The Lord Raglan, a pub near the London Museum was recommended, but that
was closed it seems (apparently they are closed on weekends).
--
wf.
Des Small
2005-11-22 22:23:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by randee
Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited England for weeks at
a time for many years (they are great Shakespeare fans and attend many
plays), and yet they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area. They said
they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that area caters more
to the business trade, rather than to the tourist trade.
Very much so. It's where a lot of merchant banks and such like are
based, and I would never have been there but for merchant banker
friends.

Des
chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco 24h offy
2005-11-22 22:26:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Des Small
Post by randee
Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited England for weeks at
a time for many years (they are great Shakespeare fans and attend many
plays), and yet they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area. They said
they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that area caters more
to the business trade, rather than to the tourist trade.
Very much so. It's where a lot of merchant banks and such like are
based, and I would never have been there but for merchant banker
friends.
I've been there, and none of my friends are bankers.

I like the Docklands Light Railway station very much, and the cavernous
tube station is a delight. I'll get my anorak...
--
David Horne- http://www.davidhorne.net
usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
http://homepage.mac.com/davidhornecomposer http://soundjunction.org
Des Small
2005-11-22 23:53:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco 24h offy
Post by Des Small
Post by randee
Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited England for weeks at
a time for many years (they are great Shakespeare fans and attend many
plays), and yet they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area. They said
they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that area caters more
to the business trade, rather than to the tourist trade.
Very much so. It's where a lot of merchant banks and such like are
based, and I would never have been there but for merchant banker
friends.
I've been there, and none of my friends are bankers.
I like the Docklands Light Railway station very much, and the cavernous
tube station is a delight. I'll get my anorak...
Marvellous trains. Did you know that they can turn their heads right
round? (Or is that owls?)

The Dome station was elected unopposed for the Kim Il Yung prize for
gratuitous monumentalisme in the face of adversity, though.

Des
chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco 24h offy
2005-11-22 23:55:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Des Small
Post by chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco 24h offy
Post by Des Small
Post by randee
Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited England for weeks at
a time for many years (they are great Shakespeare fans and attend many
plays), and yet they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area. They said
they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that area caters more
to the business trade, rather than to the tourist trade.
Very much so. It's where a lot of merchant banks and such like are
based, and I would never have been there but for merchant banker
friends.
I've been there, and none of my friends are bankers.
I like the Docklands Light Railway station very much, and the cavernous
tube station is a delight. I'll get my anorak...
Marvellous trains. Did you know that they can turn their heads right
round? (Or is that owls?)
The Dome station was elected unopposed for the Kim Il Yung prize for
gratuitous monumentalisme in the face of adversity, though.
Well, many of the new Jubilee Line stations are wonderful wastes of
space IMO, but you're the one with the merchant banker friends! :)
--
David Horne- http://www.davidhorne.net
usenet (at) davidhorne (dot) co (dot) uk
http://homepage.mac.com/davidhornecomposer http://soundjunction.org
James Silverton
2005-11-23 00:10:04 UTC
Permalink
Des wrote on 22 Nov 2005 23:53:08 +0000:

??>> Des Small <***@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
??>>
??>>> randee <***@zianet.com> writes:
??>>>
??>>>> Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited
??>>>> England for weeks at a time for many years (they are
??>>>> great Shakespeare fans and attend many plays), and yet
??>>>> they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area. They said
??>>>> they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that
??>>>> area caters more to the business trade, rather than to
??>>>> the tourist trade.
??>>>
??>>> Very much so. It's where a lot of merchant banks and
??>>> such like are based, and I would never have been there
??>>> but for merchant banker friends.
??>>
??>> I've been there, and none of my friends are bankers.
??>>
??>> I like the Docklands Light Railway station very much, and
??>> the cavernous tube station is a delight. I'll get my
??>> anorak...

DS> Marvellous trains. Did you know that they can turn their
DS> heads right round? (Or is that owls?)

DS> The Dome station was elected unopposed for the Kim Il Yung
DS> prize for gratuitous monumentalisme in the face of
DS> adversity, though.

Is that the same thing as the King Jong II of Korea prize?

James Silverton.
Des Small
2005-11-23 09:40:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
DS> The Dome station was elected unopposed for the Kim Il Yung
DS> prize for gratuitous monumentalisme in the face of
DS> adversity, though.
Is that the same thing as the King Jong II of Korea prize?
Similar, but much, much better.

Des
Martin
2005-11-23 10:32:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Des Small
Post by James Silverton
DS> The Dome station was elected unopposed for the Kim Il Yung
DS> prize for gratuitous monumentalisme in the face of
DS> adversity, though.
Is that the same thing as the King Jong II of Korea prize?
Similar, but much, much better.
For substantially worse monuments to stupidity. It's odd that the dome
hasn't succumbed to a mysterious fire.
--
Martin
Martin
2005-11-23 09:50:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Des Small
Post by chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco 24h offy
Post by Des Small
Post by randee
Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited England for weeks at
a time for many years (they are great Shakespeare fans and attend many
plays), and yet they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area. They said
they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that area caters more
to the business trade, rather than to the tourist trade.
Very much so. It's where a lot of merchant banks and such like are
based, and I would never have been there but for merchant banker
friends.
I've been there, and none of my friends are bankers.
I like the Docklands Light Railway station very much, and the cavernous
tube station is a delight. I'll get my anorak...
Marvellous trains. Did you know that they can turn their heads right
round? (Or is that owls?)
The Dome station was elected unopposed for the Kim Il Yung prize for
gratuitous monumentalisme in the face of adversity, though.
Why didn't they spend the money on a stadium?
--
Martin
The Reid
2005-11-23 11:22:25 UTC
Permalink
Following up to chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and
prestwich tesco 24h offy
Post by chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco 24h offy
Post by Des Small
Very much so. It's where a lot of merchant banks and such like are
based, and I would never have been there but for merchant banker
friends.
I've been there, and none of my friends are bankers.
Me too and lots of my friends are..., oh, I misread that.
Post by chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco 24h offy
I like the Docklands Light Railway station very much, and the cavernous
tube station is a delight. I'll get my anorak...
there are some good car parks too, I'll get my sheepskin
jacket....
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
Martin
2005-11-23 12:59:02 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 11:22:25 +0000, The Reid
Post by The Reid
Following up to chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and
prestwich tesco 24h offy
Post by chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco 24h offy
Post by Des Small
Very much so. It's where a lot of merchant banks and such like are
based, and I would never have been there but for merchant banker
friends.
I've been there, and none of my friends are bankers.
Me too and lots of my friends are..., oh, I misread that.
Post by chancellor of the duchy of besses o' th' barn and prestwich tesco 24h offy
I like the Docklands Light Railway station very much, and the cavernous
tube station is a delight. I'll get my anorak...
there are some good car parks too, I'll get my sheepskin
jacket....
... you left your Biggles flying helmet on the bar last night.
--
Martin
Richard J.
2005-11-22 22:46:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by randee
This thread has gotten so long I don't quite know where to enter it
with more info, so I will start anew.
The sandwich my wife had for 6 pounds sterling was not at Browns in
the West India Quay area as I thought, but rather at a bar near the
'Eye'. Randee said it was a rather upscale bar and she figured the
prices might be a bit high, but they were hungry and spotted that bar
before a pub. The sandwich was a plain cheese and tomato sandwich
with no side dishes.
As a Londoner, I have to say that a plain cheese & tomato sandwich for 6
GBP is a complete rip-off. If you can find out the name of this bar or
where it was in relation to the Eye, I would be interested to pursue
this further. Was the bar in the Marriott Hotel inside County Hall, the
large building between the Eye and Westminster Bridge?

[...]
Post by randee
Randee also tells me that the lunch menus at the places like Brown's
where she ate in the West India Quay area were all priced in the 4-5
UKP region.
It's possible they have some cheaper dishes on offer for a light lunch,
but their prices for main dishes are about 8 - 16 GBP in all their
London branches.
Post by randee
Same for the small individual pizzas. She said the
pizza's, although good, were perhaps not that much better than what
you get in the US, and the price would have been reasonable if it
were in USD.
Not sure where this was, but most pizzas at the main pizza chains such
as Pizza Express are typically 7 - 8 GBP. A pizza at 4-5 GBP is either
very small or not worth eating.
Post by randee
From what I gather, the Canary Wharf area where she was
staying is perhaps somewhat high priced. SHe did not choose the area
- not sure who did, probably her niece who works for Marriott.
Restaurants like Brown's, Pizza Express, Café Rouge with branches at
Canary Wharf have prices the same as elsewhere in London.
Post by randee
Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited England for weeks
at a time for many years (they are great Shakespeare fans and attend
many plays), and yet they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area.
They said they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that area
caters more to the business trade, rather than to the tourist trade.
Indeed it does. It's effectively an extension of the City of London
("the City") financial district. However, it's worth a visit by
tourists to see a part of London that is like no other, completely
transforming the old Docklands.

[...]
Post by randee
The Lord Raglan, a pub near the London Museum was recommended, but
that was closed it seems (apparently they are closed on weekends).
That's in the City near St Paul's. The City is pretty quiet at
weekends, and I know many restaurants are closed, and I guess that
applies to pubs as well.
--
Richard J.
Go Fig
2005-11-23 02:23:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard J.
Post by randee
This thread has gotten so long I don't quite know where to enter it
with more info, so I will start anew.
The sandwich my wife had for 6 pounds sterling was not at Browns in
the West India Quay area as I thought, but rather at a bar near the
'Eye'. Randee said it was a rather upscale bar and she figured the
prices might be a bit high, but they were hungry and spotted that bar
before a pub. The sandwich was a plain cheese and tomato sandwich
with no side dishes.
As a Londoner, I have to say that a plain cheese & tomato sandwich for 6
GBP is a complete rip-off. If you can find out the name of this bar or
where it was in relation to the Eye, I would be interested to pursue
this further. Was the bar in the Marriott Hotel inside County Hall, the
large building between the Eye and Westminster Bridge?
Across from the entrance of the Travel Inn, also in County Hall, is a
upscale bar... it use to be "Bar One", but in Sept. I saw that it had
change ownership.

jay
Tue Nov 22, 2005
Post by Richard J.
[...]
Post by randee
Randee also tells me that the lunch menus at the places like Brown's
where she ate in the West India Quay area were all priced in the 4-5
UKP region.
It's possible they have some cheaper dishes on offer for a light lunch,
but their prices for main dishes are about 8 - 16 GBP in all their
London branches.
Post by randee
Same for the small individual pizzas. She said the
pizza's, although good, were perhaps not that much better than what
you get in the US, and the price would have been reasonable if it
were in USD.
Not sure where this was, but most pizzas at the main pizza chains such
as Pizza Express are typically 7 - 8 GBP. A pizza at 4-5 GBP is either
very small or not worth eating.
Post by randee
From what I gather, the Canary Wharf area where she was
staying is perhaps somewhat high priced. SHe did not choose the area
- not sure who did, probably her niece who works for Marriott.
Restaurants like Brown's, Pizza Express, Café Rouge with branches at
Canary Wharf have prices the same as elsewhere in London.
Post by randee
Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited England for weeks
at a time for many years (they are great Shakespeare fans and attend
many plays), and yet they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area.
They said they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that area
caters more to the business trade, rather than to the tourist trade.
Indeed it does. It's effectively an extension of the City of London
("the City") financial district. However, it's worth a visit by
tourists to see a part of London that is like no other, completely
transforming the old Docklands.
[...]
Post by randee
The Lord Raglan, a pub near the London Museum was recommended, but
that was closed it seems (apparently they are closed on weekends).
That's in the City near St Paul's. The City is pretty quiet at
weekends, and I know many restaurants are closed, and I guess that
applies to pubs as well.
The Reid
2005-11-23 11:22:25 UTC
Permalink
Following up to Go Fig
Post by Go Fig
Across from the entrance of the Travel Inn, also in County Hall, is a
upscale bar... it use to be "Bar One", but in Sept. I saw that it had
change ownership.
I used to work in County Hall when it was a County Hall, none of
the bars in it now have tempted me to go in, Bar One (a chain I
think) of trendy bars who probably wouldn't have had a real
bitter on sale anyway. The best places to eat and drink are down
in Lower Marsh and the Cut, away from the river and the tourists
or along the river upstream at the Concert Halls. There's nothing
downstream for a mile or more. there are some good pubs across
the river.
--
Mike Reid
Drinking the Thames path "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/thamespath.htm"
The Reid
2005-11-23 11:22:25 UTC
Permalink
Following up to Richard J.
Post by Richard J.
As a Londoner, I have to say that a plain cheese & tomato sandwich for 6
GBP is a complete rip-off.
Yes, it really is.
Post by Richard J.
If you can find out the name of this bar or
where it was in relation to the Eye, I would be interested to pursue
this further. Was the bar in the Marriott Hotel inside County Hall, the
large building between the Eye and Westminster Bridge?
this building, on the left:-
"http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/eye3x.htm"
or right:-
"http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/thame315x.htm"

It was the seat of London local govt until Thatcher sold it off,
there are multiple hotels, bars and restaurants housed in it, so
the name of the actual place is needed.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
The Reid
2005-11-23 11:22:25 UTC
Permalink
Following up to randee
Post by randee
The sandwich my wife had for 6 pounds sterling was not at Browns in the
West India Quay area as I thought, but rather at a bar near the 'Eye'.
Randee said it was a rather upscale bar and she figured the prices might
be a bit high, but they were hungry and spotted that bar before a pub.
The sandwich was a plain cheese and tomato sandwich with no side
dishes.
blimey, a real rip off.
Post by randee
Without thinking she did order a lager to go with it. It was chilly
outside and she had actually wanted a 'warm' beer, but I think the term
'lager' appealed to her more than 'bitter'. She had just arrived and so
was still suffering jet lag (it is a 17 hour trip from here to Gatwick)
and not thinking too straight. As an aside, ales are served at the same
temperature as lagers here in the US, even at microbreweries.
There is a US style microbrewer in Greenwich (London) you have to
buy two pints at a time and wait for the beer to warm up so you
can taste it!
Post by randee
Randee also tells me that the lunch menus at the places like Brown's
where she ate in the West India Quay area were all priced in the 4-5 UKP
region. Same for the small individual pizzas. She said the pizza's,
although good, were perhaps not that much better than what you get in
the US, and the price would have been reasonable if it were in USD.
The pound is strong at the moment and the dollar weak (and London
is expensive anyway), I doubt anything will seem good value.
Post by randee
From what I gather, the Canary Wharf area where she was staying is
perhaps somewhat high priced. SHe did not choose the area - not sure
who did, probably her niece who works for Marriott.
Its the new business district where river side flats can cost
millions and some employees are said to get 1,000,000UKP bonuses.
Post by randee
Curiously enough, we have friends who have visited England for weeks at
a time for many years (they are great Shakespeare fans and attend many
plays), and yet they had no clue about the Canary Wharf area. They said
they never had any occasion to go there. Must be that area caters more
to the business trade, rather than to the tourist trade.
Yes, the riverside is worth walking along, but the rest is office
tower blocks, luxury flats with a few council estates (projects)
dotted about. There is still lots of evidence of the old docks
and some good pubs, but you don't see tourists there.

photos "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/canary4x.htm"
"http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/thame047x.htm"
"http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/isleofdogs2.htm"
Post by randee
The Lord Raglan, a pub near the London Museum was recommended, but that
was closed it seems (apparently they are closed on weekends).
yes, pubs actually in the City tend to be closed at weekends as
the office worker customers are absent. If you walk into Central
London along the river from Canary Wharf, you will pass The
Grapes (good fish restaurant, pricey) the Narrow Street Pub (good
food, limited beer), The Prospect of Whitby, The Town of Ramsgate
and the Captain Kidd. so that's five pints, there's a public
toilet in St Catherine's dock :-) then there's the Charles
Dickens and the....
--
Mike Reid
Drinking the Thames path "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/thamespath.htm"
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...